• Service times

    Services times are:

    Saturday night 7:30 pm for our Chinese/English service. (Pastor Daniel Choi.)

    Sunday 10 am for our English language service (Senior Pastor Jeff Whittaker).

    Sunday 11:30 am for our Chinese (Mandarin) language service. (Pastor Daniel Choi.)

  • Contact details…

    Physical and postal address:
    4 Inverary Avenue,
    Epsom,
    Auckland 1023,
    NEW ZEALAND.

    Email:
    epsombaptist@gmail.com

    Telephone:
    (0064 9) 6306010

    Contacts:
    Rev. Jeff Whittaker
    Pastor Daniel Choi

  • Church Officers…

    Church Treasurer: Ann Guan

    Church Secretary: Margaret Whittaker

    Church Deacons: Anne Bartley, Ian de Stigter, Kristy Choi, Willa Hui, Donglan Zhang and Alfred Zhou.

Trust us: We’re responsible!

Impassioned pleas for trust in exchange for reduced regulatory control have been and are heard from many industries. And all sorts of regulatory bodies have heard the pleas, and reduced watch-dog duties. If this has been done not with gladness but with misgivings, never-the-less a trust that industries can and will self-regulate has come to pass. How foolish such misplaced trust has proved to be. In the oil exploration industry, the huge spill from BP’s drilling in the Gulf of Mexico is partly due to relaxed regulatory controls. Six or seven years ago, some apartment buildings in Tokyo were found to have been constructed in sub-standard ways that left them vulnerable to earthquake damage after supervision of the building industry there was relaxed. In New Zealand’s building industry, a similar relaxation of regulations has led to a debacle labeled ‘leaky buildings.’ The bill is expected to exceed that from the recent spate of earthquakes in Christchurch, itself one of the most costly insurance events on the planet. In Europe, doctors under-report the number of patients they have euthanized in systems in which they are trusted to report accurately. Turning back to New Zealand, the fishing industry has the gall to ask for more de-regulation after the exposure of illegal fish-dumping and labour practices that are tantamount to modern-day slavery. And perhaps the most scandalous of all is the trust requested by the global financial industry, a trust that has been repaid by such levels of greed and self-interested mismanagement that the world’s financial system has been plunged into chaos.

Illegal fish dumping may be common practice.

Seehttp://www.3news.co.nz/Illegal-fish-dumping-may-be-common-practice/tabid/1160/articleID/254091/Default.aspx

When will we learn that human beings are not to be trusted, especially if there is money to be made from taking short-cuts or even blatant cheating. Regulation and supervision is not the responsibility of the ones requiring the regulation, control, or supervision. It is a legitimate role of government. Neo-liberal demands for less government are naïve at best, and catastrophically destructive at the worst. When such agendas are supposedly supported by conservative Christian voices, something is very wrong. A constant refrain in the Bible is that the poor, the vulnerable, the marginalized, those who in fact bear the brunt of the greed and cynical practices described above…all these are to be protected and cared for. This too is a responsibility of government. Further, we Christians believe that God does see and hold accountable all of us, and that there will be a day of reckoning. God is a God of love, and this is freely given to all (if they could but see it). But trust, no. Trust is always earned. And, as the Bible states from beginning to end, human beings are simply not be trusted. Governments must ignore impassioned cries for trust, for the common good.

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2 Responses

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